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In politics, you’re often told not to get lost in the weeds. But we love the weeds! That’s where politics becomes policy – the stuff that shapes our lives. Every Tuesday and Friday, host Matthew Yglesias is joined by Vox reporters and editors, ProPublica's Dara Lind, and some of the leading minds in policy to dig into the weeds on important national issues, including healthcare, immigration, housing, and everything else that matters. Produced by Vox and the Vox Media Podcast Network.

The Weeds Vox

    • Новости

In politics, you’re often told not to get lost in the weeds. But we love the weeds! That’s where politics becomes policy – the stuff that shapes our lives. Every Tuesday and Friday, host Matthew Yglesias is joined by Vox reporters and editors, ProPublica's Dara Lind, and some of the leading minds in policy to dig into the weeds on important national issues, including healthcare, immigration, housing, and everything else that matters. Produced by Vox and the Vox Media Podcast Network.

    Prices on the rise

    Prices on the rise

    Matt is joined by economist Julia Coronado to talk about inflation, markets, and employment in the pandemic recovery economy. They discuss housing, new and used car markets, and possible strategies toward achieving full employment.
    Resources:
    "Economic Outlook and Risks to Inflation" by Julia Coronado (presentation to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York Economic Advisory Panel; April 9)
    "Here's Who Will Be Left Behind in the Housing Boom" by Ali Wolf (New York Times; July 13)

    Guest:
    Julia Coronado (@jc_econ), Founder and President, MacroPolicy Perspectives; Clinical Professor of Finance, UT Austin
    Host:
    Matt Yglesias (@mattyglesias), Slowboring.com
    Credits:
    Erikk Geannikis (@erikk38), Producer
    Ness Smith-Savedoff, Engineer

    As the Biden administration gears up, we'll help you understand this unprecedented burst of policymaking. Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weeds-newsletter.

    The Weeds is a Vox Media Podcast Network production.
    Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a contribution to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts

    About Vox
    Vox is a news network that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines.
    Follow Us: Vox.com
    Facebook group: The Weeds
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    • 44 мин.
    Time Machine: Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965

    Time Machine: Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965

    Vox's Li Zhou joins Dara and Matt for another spin in the time machine, to talk about the policy that shaped how immigration largely still works in America. They discuss the history and context of the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 (a.k.a. the Hart-Celler Act), and the previous discriminatory immigration policies that preceded it. Our hosts also discuss how this piece of legislation shaped — and still shapes — the way immigration in America takes place today.
    Resources:
    One Mighty and Irresistible Tide: The Epic Struggle Over American Immigration, 1924-1965 by Jia Lynn Yang (W.W. Norton; 2021)
    "Unintended Consequences of US Immigration Policy: Explaining the Post-1965 Surge from Latin America" by Douglas S Massey and Karen A. Pren (Popul Dev Rev.; 2012)
    "Modern Immigration Wave Brings 59 Million to U.S., Driving Population Growth and Change Through 2065: Views of Immigration's Impact on U.S. Society Mixed" (Pew Research Center, 2015)
    "Who Was Shut Out? Immigration Quotas, 1925-1927" (GMU/Statistical Abstract of the United States, 1929)
    Impossible Subjects: Illegal Aliens and the Making of Modern America by Mae M. Ngai (Princeton; 2014)
    "Why income inequality is growing at the fastest rate among Asian Americans" by Natalie Zhang (CNBC; May 26)
    The Making of Asian America by Erika Lee (Simon & Schuster; 2015)

    Hosts:
    Matt Yglesias (@mattyglesias), Slowboring.com
    Dara Lind (@DLind), Immigration Reporter, ProPublica
    Li Zhou (@liszhou), Politics and policy reporter, Vox

    Credits:
    Erikk Geannikis (@erikk38), Producer
    Ness Smith-Savedoff, Engineer

    As the Biden administration gears up, we'll help you understand this unprecedented burst of policymaking. Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weeds-newsletter.

    The Weeds is a Vox Media Podcast Network production.
    Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a contribution to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts

    About Vox
    Vox is a news network that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines.
    Follow Us: Vox.com
    Facebook group: The Weeds
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    • 56 мин.
    The critical race theory debate

    The critical race theory debate

    Matt is joined by Education Week reporter and editor Andrew Ujifusa to talk about the ill-defined and somewhat facetious debate over critical race theory. But really, this conversation is about the schools, and all sorts of issues facing them: pandemic learning loss, re-opening plans, and the perennial debates over how best to serve all students, particularly students of color.
    We are conducting an audience survey to better serve you. It takes about five minutes, and it really helps out the show. Please take our survey here: vox.com/survey
    Resources:
    "'Stop CRT' Bill, Votes in Congress Add to Political Drama Over Critical Race Theory" by Andrew Ujifusa (Education Week; July 15)
    "How to Manufacture a Moral Panic: Christopher Rufo helped incite an uproar over racism education with dramatic, dodgy reporting" by Sarah Jones (New York; July 11)
    "Randi Weingarten Rips CRT Critics for 'Trying to Stop Us From Teaching Students Accurate History'" by John Nichols (The Nation; July 9)
    Guest:
    Andrew Ujifusa (@AndrewUjifusa), Assistant Editor, Education Week
    Host:
    Matt Yglesias (@mattyglesias), Slowboring.com
    Credits:
    Erikk Geannikis (@erikk38), Producer
    Ness Smith-Savedoff, Engineer

    As the Biden administration gears up, we'll help you understand this unprecedented burst of policymaking. Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weeds-newsletter.

    The Weeds is a Vox Media Podcast Network production.
    Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a contribution to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts

    About Vox
    Vox is a news network that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines.
    Follow Us: Vox.com
    Facebook group: The Weeds
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    • 57 мин.
    Time Machine: Volcker Shock

    Time Machine: Volcker Shock

    Vox's Dylan Matthews joins Matt and Dara for another step into Weeds Time Machine: a visit to the past to review some now-forgotten chapter in policy history. This week, it's a return to the late 1970s and a reexamination of "Volcker shock": an attempt by Fed Chairman Paul Volcker to cope with rising inflation, and the myriad consequences of his efforts. Our hosts discuss the oil crisis, stagflation, the curious relationship between central banking and fiscal policy, and give some much-needed reanalysis to this crucial and topsy-turvy time in American history.
    We are conducting an audience survey to better serve you. It takes about five minutes, and it really helps out the show. Please take our survey here: vox.com/survey
    Resources:
    Charts: Unemployment in the 1970s & Inflation in the 1970s
    "America's Peacetime Inflation: The 1970s" by J. Bradford De Long in Reducing Inflation: Motivation and Strategy, eds. Christina D. Romer and David H. Romer (U. Chicago; 1997)
    "Commentary" [on 1970s inflation] by Christina D. Romer (Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis Review; 2005)
    Keeping At It: The Quest for Sound Money and Good Government by Paul Volcker (Public Affairs; 2018)
    "Other People's Blood" by Tim Barker (n+1; 2019)
    "Paul Volcker Was a Hero of the Ruling Class" by Doug Henwood (Jacobin; 2019)
    The Economists' Hour: False Prophets, Free Markets, and the Fracture of Society by Binyamin Appelbaum (Little, Brown; 2019)
    "What really drives inflation" [on "Regulation Q"] by Itamar Drechsler, Alexi Savov, Philipp Schnabl (Sept. 11, 2019)
    "Paul Volcker's Complicated Latin American Legacy" by Tyler Cowen (Bloomberg; Dec. 10, 2019)
    "The Rise of Finance" by Jonathan Levy (Public Books; Nov. 22, 2011)

    Hosts:
    Matt Yglesias (@mattyglesias), Slowboring.com
    Dara Lind (@DLind), Immigration Reporter, ProPublica
    Dylan Matthews (@dylanmatt), Senior Correspondent, Vox

    Credits:
    Erikk Geannikis (@erikk38), Producer
    Ness Smith-Savedoff, Engineer

    As the Biden administration gears up, we'll help you understand this unprecedented burst of policymaking. Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weeds-newsletter.

    The Weeds is a Vox Media Podcast Network production.
    Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a contribution to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts

    About Vox
    Vox is a news network that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines.
    Follow Us: Vox.com
    Facebook group: The Weeds
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    • 1 ч. 10 мин.
    Cruelty: the point

    Cruelty: the point

    Matt is joined by Atlantic staff writer Adam Serwer, author of the new book The Cruelty Is the Point. They discuss the racial politics of the Trump-era, how these tactics persist in the GOP today, and how the dynamics of the present moment have led us to relitigate Reconstruction-era problems that go against the fundamental understanding of American equity. They also have a few things to say in there about Die Hard and Indiana Jones.
    Resources:
    "The Cruelty Is the Point" by Adam Serwer (The Atlantic; Oct. 3, 2018)
    The Cruelty Is the Point: The Past, Present, and Future of Trump's America by Adam Serwer (Penguin Random House, June 2021)
    "The Flight 93 Election" by Michael Anton (Claremont Review of Books; Sept. 5, 2016)
    "The Great Awokening" by Matthew Yglesias (Vox; Apr. 1, 2019)
    "The Case for Reparations" by Ta-Nehisi Coates (The Atlantic; June 2014)
    Steadfast Democrats: How Social Forces Shape Black Political Behavior by Ismail K. White and Chryl N. Laird (Princeton' Oct. 2021)
    Schoolbook Nation: Conflicts over American History Textbooks from the Civil War to the Present by Joseph Moreau (U. Michigan; 2004)

    Guest:
    Adam Serwer (@AdamSerwer), staff writer, The Atlantic; author, The Cruelty Is the Point
    Host:
    Matt Yglesias (@mattyglesias), Slowboring.com
    Credits:
    Erikk Geannikis, Producer
    Ness Smith-Savedoff, Engineer

    As the Biden administration gears up, we'll help you understand this unprecedented burst of policymaking. Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weeds-newsletter.

    The Weeds is a Vox Media Podcast Network production.
    Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a contribution to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts

    About Vox
    Vox is a news network that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines.
    Follow Us: Vox.com
    Facebook group: The Weeds
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    • 1 ч. 1 мин.
    Time Machine: No Child Left Behind

    Time Machine: No Child Left Behind

    Vox's Libby Nelson joins Matt and Dara on the first episode of the Weeds Time Machine: a visit to the past to review some now-forgotten chapter in policy history. This week, it's No Child Left Behind. Our hosts discuss the bipartisan consensus that existed at the outset of this policy, how everyone eventually turned on it, and the legacy it still leaves behind in our school systems today.
    Resources:
    "The GOP's Plan to Take Education Policy Back to the Early 1990s" by Kevin Carey (Oct. 5, 2011; The New Republic)
    "The scariest lesson of No Child Left Behind" by Libby Nelson (July 27, 2015; Vox)

    Hosts:
    Matt Yglesias (@mattyglesias), Slowboring.com
    Dara Lind (@DLind), Immigration Reporter, ProPublica
    Libby Nelson (@libbyanelson), Deputy Policy Editor, Vox

    Credits:
    Erikk Geannikis, Producer
    Ness Smith-Savedoff, Engineer

    As the Biden administration gears up, we'll help you understand this unprecedented burst of policymaking. Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weeds-newsletter.

    The Weeds is a Vox Media Podcast Network production.
    Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a contribution to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts

    About Vox
    Vox is a news network that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines.
    Follow Us: Vox.com
    Facebook group: The Weeds
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    • 1 ч. 4 мин.

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