Как стать счастливее и уверенно идти к целям? Работающие советы — в книге «Сам себе государство. Как совершить революцию в жизни». Подробнее ‎«Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly» в Apple Podcasts

Выпусков: 250

Each weekday, Marketplace’s Kai Ryssdal and Molly Wood make today make sense. Along with our supersmart listeners, we break down happenings in tech, the economy and culture. Every Tuesday we bring on a guest to dive deeper into one important topic. Because none of us is as smart as all of us.

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly American Public Media

    • Бизнес
    • 5,0 • 1 оценка

Each weekday, Marketplace’s Kai Ryssdal and Molly Wood make today make sense. Along with our supersmart listeners, we break down happenings in tech, the economy and culture. Every Tuesday we bring on a guest to dive deeper into one important topic. Because none of us is as smart as all of us.

    More about Facebook’s cost of doing business

    More about Facebook’s cost of doing business

    Today we get hallowed out from more revelations from The Wall Street Journal’s ongoing reporting of what goes on behind the scenes at Facebook and the tradeoffs the tech giant makes in order to stay a tech giant. We also take a look at the Federal Reserve’s review of its ethics rules. And a Make Me Smile courtesy of listeners like you.



    Here’s everything we talked about on today’s show:




    “Facebook Employees Flag Drug Cartels and Human Traffickers. The Company’s Response Is Weak, Documents Show” from The Wall Street Journal
    “Instagram boss Adam Mosseri on teenagers, TikToks and paying creators” from Recode Media
    “Instagram boss says social media is like cars: People are going to die” from Mashable
    “Powell opens review into Fed ethics rules after backlash over trading” from Politico
    “Newsom California recall election’s costly lessons” from The Los Angeles Times



    Give now to support the show you love and to get the “Make Me Smart” banana pants and ringtones! Marketplace.org/givesmart.

    • 14 мин.
    What if the minimum wage was raised like Social Security?

    What if the minimum wage was raised like Social Security?

    A lot of things are affected by inflation. How come minimum wage isn’t one of them?



    On today’s show, we get to the bottom of one listener’s question about minimum wage, but we can’t promise the answer is logical. Plus, we explain the big deal with TikTok and check out some weird beers!



    Here’s everything we talked about on the show today:




    “These two charts show how much minimum wage workers have fallen behind” from CNN
    “Why can’t our political system address our biggest problems?” from The Washington Post
    “When it comes to raising the minimum wage, most of the action is in cities and states, not Congress” from Pew Research Center
    “Let’s do the numbers on a $15 minimum wage” from Make Me Smart
    “TikTok rolls out features to help teens’ mental health as Instagram comes under fire” from CNBC
    “How TikTok went from dance videos to meaningful activism” from Vogue
    “TikTok becomes the most downloaded app of 2021 first half” from Technotifiction

    Read the transcript here.

    Give now to support the show you love and to get the “Make Me Smart” banana pants and ringtones! Marketplace.org/givesmart.

    • 14 мин.
    Occupy Wall Street, 10 years later

    Occupy Wall Street, 10 years later

    Ten years ago this week, a group of activists pitched tents in New York’s Zuccotti Park. They said they were protesting against economic inequality and the gap between the people who hold the top 1% of wealth in this country and the rest of us.



    Soon, people in cities all over the globe launched their own Occupy Wall Street protests, and while police broke up the original protest in New York two months later, Occupy Wall Street went a lot longer and a lot further than many expected.



    “There were experts, people in the social sciences who had been studying inequality, and were very well aware of its explosive growth in the period since the 1970s. But it wasn’t really on the radar of the general population until Occupy. I think that was one of the major impacts,” said Ruth Milkman, a sociology professor at the City University of New York Graduate Center, who has studied the Occupy Wall Street movement.



    Milkman said while Occupy Wall Street may not have done much to close the growing income inequality gap in this country, it made the issue part of the national political conversation. She also draws lines between Occupy, the Fight for $15, the rise of Bernie Sanders and other social movements that followed, including Black Lives Matter.



    On today’s show, we’ll talk with Milkman about the legacy of Occupy Wall Street.



    In the newsfix, we’ll talk about Facebook and a new project from The Wall Street Journal that reveals troubling information about what’s happening inside company. Plus, we’ll hear from one of our favorite listeners and one of best low-key answers to the Make Me Smart question we’ve received in a while.



    Read the transcript here.

    When you’re done listening, tell your Echo device to “make me smart” for our daily explainers. This week we’ll explain why hit songs are getting shorter, why child care is so expensive and how drive-in movie theaters made a comeback. Also, don’t forget to subscribe to our newsletter! You can find the latest issue here.



    Give now to support the show you love and to get the “Make Me Smart” banana pants and ringtones! Marketplace.org/givesmart.



    Here’s everything we talked about today:




    “Changing the Subject: A Bottom Up Account of Occupy Wall Street in New York City” co-authored by Prof. Milkman
    “It’s Been Another Decade Of Income Inequality In The U.S.” from NPR
    “Occupy Wall Street Did More Than You Think” from The Atlantic
    “The Facebook Files” from The Wall Street Journal
    “Amazon hikes starting pay to $18 an hour” from Reuters
    “Climate change to change behavior, 80% of respondents tell Pew” from CNBC

    • 27 мин.
    Apple says update your devices now

    Apple says update your devices now

    Apple’s security impermeability has been shattered to pieces. Today, Apple issued an emergency software update for its products after researchers discovered devices could be infected with the highly invasive Pegasus software without a single click. We’ll explain what that means for your security. Plus, “Shipageddon” will be with us until 2022, and we discuss a few science-related stories you might’ve missed, including one about baby cows being potty-trained. And finally, one of the fashion industry’s biggest parties is making us smile (#metgala).

    Here’s everything we talked about today:


    “Apple Issues Emergency Security Updates to Close a Spyware Flaw” from The New York Times
    “U.S. Ports See Shipping Logjams Likely Extending Far Into 2022” from The Wall Street Journal
    “Supply chain crisis will leave permanent scar, UPS warns” from The Financial Times
    “Courting moderates, House Democrats stop short of proposing the most aggressive plans to tax the rich” from The New York Times
    “Scientists Claim Overeating Is Not the Primary Cause of Obesity — Point to More Effective Weight Loss Strategies” from SciTech Daily
    David Leonhardt op-ed about his month without sugar
    “For a livable future, 60% of oil and gas must stay in the ground” from Grist
    “Meat accounts for nearly 60% of all greenhouse gases from food production, study finds” from The Guardian
    A tweet thread from U.S. Rep. Katie Porter
    “The Real Reason Workers Want to Stay Remote: 75% Can’t Leave Their Pandemic Pets Behind” from Digital.com
    “Scientists Are Toilet-Training Baby Cows to Cut Emissions” from Bloomberg
    #MetGala 

    Read the transcript here.

    Give now to support the show you love and to get the “Make Me Smart” banana pants and ringtones! Marketplace.org/givesmart.

    • 21 мин.
    The problem with politicians owning and trading stocks

    The problem with politicians owning and trading stocks

    Whether the United States moves on climate change may come down to one person — Sen. Joe Manchin. Will his personal financial investments in the energy industry stand in the way? We’ll discuss the ethics around policymakers profiting from industries they’re supposed to be writing the rules for. Plus, we check in on U.S.-China trade relations and Epic v. Apple legal battle. Finally, we close this short/long week, with a round of our favorite game, Half Full/Half Empty.



    Here’s everything we talked about today:




    “ECB Will Slow Its Crisis-Era Bond Buying” from The New York Times
    “Tracking Viral Misinformation: Latest Updates” also from The New York Times
    “Biden Administration Takes Aim at China’s Industrial Subsidies” from The Wall Street Journal
    “Apple must allow other forms of in-app purchases, rules judge in Epic v. Apple” from The Verge
    “Epic will appeal the Epic v. Apple decision” also from The Verge
    “After a Summer of Disasters, Some Lawmakers See a Chance for Climate Action” from The New York Times
    Molly’s thread on Joe Manchin’s financial connections to energy industry
    “Democrats Unveil Details of Sweeping Climate Change Spending Plan” from The New York Times
    “Dallas Fed’s Robert Kaplan Was Active Buyer and Seller of Stocks Last Year” from The Wall Street Journal
    The Stock Act 
    “More Americans are looking to retire earlier” from Marketplace
    “Facebook just announced its new Ray-Bay glasses- I’ve been using them for a couple of days, here’s what they’re like” from CNBC
    “Toyota Bets Big on New Battery Tech, but Leaves Plenty of Room for Hybrids” from Autoweek
    “SpaceX Inspiration4 all-civilian spaceflight” from Space.com
    “Taco Bell wants you to send back your used sauce packets so it can reuse them” from CNN



    Read the transcript here.

    Give now to support the show you love and to get the Make Me Smart banana pants and ringtones! Marketplace.org/givesmart.

    • 26 мин.
    All y’all need to get vaccinated

    All y’all need to get vaccinated

    The White House isn’t messing around. Now that the COVID-19 vaccines have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration, the Joe Biden administration has ordered two-thirds of the American workforce to get the jab. We’ll discuss the latest round of vaccine mandates. Plus, an update on the abortion ban in Texas and the buy now, pay later boom — what can possibly go wrong? Finally, we fill our hollowed-out shells with Blue’s Clues and some fun facts about rats!



    Here’s everything we talked about today:




    “Biden is requiring the vast majority of federal workers to get vaccinated or face disciplinary measures” from The New York Times
    “Justice Department Sues Texas Over New Abortion Ban” from NPR
    “As ‘buy now, pay later’ surges, a third of U.S. users fall behind on payments” from Reuters
    “Deja vu as container ship runs aground in Suez Canal but is quickly refloated“ from Metro News
    Blue’s Clues Turns 25 
    “Beached Rat Carcasses Indicate Mass Rodent Death During Ida, Experts Say” from Gothamist
    “5 fun facts about rats | Explore | Awesome Activities & Fun Facts!” from CBC



    Read the transcript here.

    Our show needs your voice! Tell us what you think of the show or ask a question for our hosts to answer! Send a voice memo or give us a call at 508-82-SMART (508-827-6278).

    • 19 мин.

Отзывы покупателей

5,0 из 5
1 оценка

1 оценка

Топ подкастов в категории «Бизнес»

Слушатели также подписываются на

Еще от: American Public Media